Camping is allowed outside of developed campgrounds as long as the Backpacking and Dispersed Camping regulations are followed.  Please be careful!!


THE VIRTUAL

DILLON RANGER DISTRICT

DISPERSED CAMPING

REGULATIONS

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Campers go hunting, hiking, driving and horseback riding throughout the forest in many areas where developed camping areas are not available.  Finding a site to camp and enjoy these activities in remote areas away from developed campgrounds has become a popular form of camping; the Forest Service calls it dispersed camping.  Dispersed camping is permitted in most areas of the Dillon Ranger District.  Unlike developed campgrounds which are designed and maintained to protect the vegetation, soils and natural setting; camping in undeveloped areas requires help from the camper to leave the site in the same condition in which it was found.  Help preserve the pristine condition of these remote areas by following these guidelines:

GENERAL INFORMATION

DISPERSED CAMPING RULES AND REGULATIONS

Dispersed camping is allowed at various areas on the National Forest and is subject to the following restrictions.  Camping more than 28 days within a continuous 60 day period, when not otherwise restricted, and occupying any campsite for more than 14 days during this 60 day period within 3 miles of the previous campsite where not otherwise restricted.  36 CFR 261.58(a) and UFC-01-06.

Dispersed camping within the Wilderness Areas are subject to the following additional restrictions:
1.  Entering or being in the area with more than 15 people per group with a maximum combination of 25 people and pack or saddle animals in any one group. 36 CFR 261.58(f)

2.  Camping  within one hundred (100) feet of any lake, stream, Forest Development Trail, or any "No Camping" or "Wilderness Restoration Site" signs.  36 CFR 261.58(e).6.

3.  Building, maintaining, attending, or using a campfire within one hundred (100) feet of any lake, stream, or Forest Development Trail or within ¼  mile of treeline or above treeline.  36 CFR 261.52(a).
                                            
4.  Storing equipment, personal property, or supplies for longer than 72 hours. 36 CFR 261.57(f).

5.   Hitching, tethering or hobbling any pack or saddle animal within one hundred (100) feet of any lake, stream, and Forest Development Trail.  36 CFR 261.58(aa).

6.   Possessing a dog, except  working stock dogs or dogs used for legal hunting purposes, unless under physical retraint of a leash not to exceed six (6) feet in length. 36 CFR 261.58(s).

7.  Possessing, storing, or transporting any plant material, such as hay or straw.  NOTE:  Exceptions are allowed for livestock feed and bedding that has been certified weed free.  36 CFR 261.58(t).

8.   Possessing or using a wagon, cart, or other vehicle, including wheelbarrows and game carts. 36 CFR 261.57(h).

9.  Shortcutting a switchback in a trail.  36 CFR 261.55(e).

Vehicles MUST remain on the road shoulder or in widened pull-outs, where they won’t interfere with traffic or damage vegetation.  Please note that some county roads may have parking restrictions.  It is your responsibility to determine if you are parked legally.   No services are provided, so please be sure to “Pack it in – Pack it out”.  NO FIREWOOD CUTTING except dead and downed wood.  Please make use of existing campsites and fire rings (if they meet the above criteria) instead of creating a new site. 

Be aware of intermingled private lands within the White River National Forest.  Forest maps area available at the Dillon Ranger District office, street address 680 Blue River Parkway in Silverthorne.  If you have any questions on where you can camp, please ask for information at the Dillon Ranger District office, phone 970.468.5400.

WATER

For short trips take a supply of drinking water from home or another domestic water source.  For longer trips, boiling water for a minimum of 5 minutes is the most effective treatment for giardia cysts and other waterborne disease organisms.  A longer boiling time may be required at higher elevations.

CAMPFIRES

Using a camp stove has less impact on the environment and provides fast, clean cooking heat.  If you must use a campfire, check at the Dillon Ranger District to make sure there are no restrictions on campfires in the District. 

When finished with the campfire ring, pack out unburned trash - leave the site clean for the next campers.  If no fire ring exists, select an area away from trees and shrubs and then clear away any pine needles, twigs or ground cover to bare mineral soil.  Use the "Pit Method" for campfires:  remove a small chunk of sod down to the cool soil to form a shallow pit, save the sod for later use, build the fire in the pit without making a rock ring.  When done with the campfire, extinguish fire with water and stir ashes until they are cold to the touch.  "Scatter" or haul away cold ashes.  Replace the sod in the pit.

Build a fire only as large as is needed.  Never leave a campfire unattended.  When you are done with the fire or leaving the campsite make sure the fire is DEAD out!

PETS

A dog's natural instinct is to chase other animals, sometimes including strange people.  If dogs are brought along on a camping trip they should be kept under control at all times to avoid frightening wildlife and other campers.  If your pet is in a Wilderness area, they MUST be on a leash not longer than six (6) feet at all times!

Before taking your dog into the backcountry, please check out some important information by clicking on Spike.

SANITATION

HUMAN WASTE

Select a suitable screened spot at least 200 feet away from open water, your camp and trails.  Dig a small hole 6 to 8 inches deep.  After use, fill the hole with the loose dirt and tramp in the sod with your foot.  Nature will dispose of the waste in a short time through decomposition.  Toilet paper should be burned or packed out.

TRASH

Pack out all trash.  Cans, bottles, aluminum foil and anything that will not burn must be carried out.  Paper and other burnable items can be burned in a small fire.  Please do NOT bury garbage or trash.

WASHING

Use a bucket or wash pan for washing dishes, clothes and bodies.  Be sure to wash well away from lake and stream banks.  Use biodegradable soaps.  Dig a small hole to pour the soapy water into after you finish washing - this prevents bits of food and soap from polluting the area around your camp.  Remember:  soap pollutes the water and injures fish and other aquatic animals - please do not wash in lakes and streams!

FISH GUTS

Bury fish guts in latrine holes.  Do not leave along lake and stream beds.


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